Courses Taught

Below you can find descriptions for the classes I have taught along with copies of my course syllabi. Feel free to get in touch with me if you have any questions about these classes or if you would like to adopt elements of them in your own teaching. I am happy to share assignments, resources, and other materials.


2016-2017

Modern and Post-Modern Poetry
 English 3535: Modernist Poetry, English Department, Fordham University (Spring)

This course offers an intensive survey of major thematic currents and formal experiments in British, Irish, and American verse, focusing largely on the first half of the 20th century, to explore the cultural narrative of modernism. In addition to signaling a specific historical period, modernism also refers to an oftentimes contradictory set of aesthetic qualities and practices. As such, we will approach our study of modernism not as a uniform phenomenon, but rather as a multivalent and dynamic process. By engaging with modernist poetry, from the work of W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, we will work together to elaborate multiple, diverse, even divergent, modernisms. Finally, although this course will concentrate primarily on the modern period, we will also examine the work of poetic precursors as well as post-modern poetry to attain a better sense of the social political and cultural transformations that instantiated the modern era as well as those that shape our contemporary moment.

Download the syllabus.

Narratives of Freedom and Captivity
English 2000: Texts and Contexts, English Department, Fordham University (Spring, 2 sections)

How do we reconcile the ways in which freedom has served as a founding ideal for the United States, a cornerstone of the American Dream, with histories of enslavement and oppression of which the nation is also guilty? In this course, we will trace how the rhetoric of freedom has been central to the development of American literature and what constitutes “American-ness” alongside the abundance of narratives of unfreedom and captivity. By examining a range of literary and cultural productions from the time of slavery in the U.S. south to the 1960s Civil Rights Movement and the expansion of the prison-industrial complex in the present, we will complicate our understanding of how freedom and unfreedom often represent two sides of the same coin that is “America.”

Download the syllabus.

Alien Encounters
English 2000: Texts and Contexts, English Department, Fordham University (Fall, 2 sections)

In this course we will track how the term “alien” has been attached to differently racialized bodies and groups by analyzing a range of literary texts that address issues of alienation, “otherness,” and xenophobia. We will examine how attending to the language of foreign aliens can illuminate an understanding of the historical and social contexts attached to the migration of diverse peoples to the United States. In addition, we will explore how the figure of the alien as a trope of science and speculative fiction has been a fruitful point of departure for minoritized authors to imagine new modes of belonging, community formation, and the possibility of other (better) worlds.

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Reading, Writing, Time Traveling
English 1002: Composition II, English Department, Fordham University (Fall)

Time travel is a captivating concept because it suggests the possibility of instantaneous transport, the ability to move from one dimension to another within seconds. And yet, in a way, we are always already moving through time and space, making time travel our most mundane and often slowest activity. In this course, we will consider how time travel functions as a generative metaphor for approaching the practice of reading and writing. We will discuss how literary and cultural productions transport us to other times and places, allowing us to encounter forgotten memories, other histories, and alien lifeforms. Moreover, keeping in mind that “it takes time to travel through time,” we will approach writing as a process that similarly takes time and care, practice and revision. In this sense, we will treat time travel as both a thematic and method for deepening our understanding of literature, art, and our practices of self expression.

Download the syllabus.


2015-2016

Envisioning Other Worlds
American Studies 316: Twenty-First Century Writing, American Studies Department, Rutgers University, New Brunswick (Fall)

Mutants, robots, zombies, vampires, and other super- or non-human beings abound in popular literature and media today. These extraordinary figures and the fantastical, often dystopian worlds they inhabit have become rather ordinary components of our shared cultural landscape. They point, moreover, to the ways in which science and speculative fiction as a genre speaks to our contemporary moment. In this course we will examine a range of cultural texts, including short stories, novels, film, comics, and visual art, to explore how science and speculative fictions allow us to envision other timespaces, dimensions, and worlds. Contemplating these texts in relation to each other and the genre of science and speculative fiction will create room for discussing changing conceptions of the human, alternate representations of race, gender, and sexuality, the contradictions of technology, and the possibilities for social justice in the present.

Download the syllabus.


2013-2014

Re-figuring the Global
English 255: Global Literatures in English, English Department, Queens College, CUNY (Spring)

Download the syllabus. Also, see this post on my experiment with student facilitation and the handout I created on blogging and facilitation guidelines.

Crossing Borders, Writing Roots
English 162w: Literature and Place, English Department, Queens College, CUNY (Fall)

Download the syllabus.

The Aesthetics of Traumatic Memory
English 110: College Writing, English Department, Queens College, CUNY (Fall)

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2012-2013

Writing Across Borders
English 162w: Literature and Place, English Department, Queens College, CUNY (Spring)

Download the syllabus.

Re-Presenting Traumatic Memories
English 110: College Writing, English Department, Queens College, CUNY (Fall)

Download the syllabus.

Literatures of the Americas
English 255: Global Literatures in English, English Department, Queens College, CUNY (Fall)

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2011-2012

Literature and Memory
English 110: College Writing, English Department, Queens College, CUNY (Spring)

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Deceiving Memories: Writing and Re-Writing Public and Private Histories (Fall, 2 sections)
English 110: College Writing, English Department, Queens College, CUNY (Fall, 2 sections)

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Photo by congerdesign on Pixabay.